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dc.contributor.authorNewton, Hannah
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-03 09:09:28
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-01T12:33:46Z
dc.date.available2020-04-01T12:33:46Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier1000321
dc.identifierOCN: 1051781028en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/29613
dc.description.abstractThe history of early modern medicine often makes for depressing reading. It implies that people fell ill, took ineffective remedies, and died. This book seeks to rebalance and brighten our overall picture of early modern health by focusing on the neglected subject of recovery from illness in England, c.1580–1720. Drawing on an array of archival and printed materials, Misery to Mirth shows that recovery did exist conceptually at this time, and that it was a widely reported phenomenon. The book takes three main perspectives: the first is physiological or medical, asking what doctors and laypeople meant by recovery, and how they thought it occurred. This includes a discussion of convalescent care, a special branch of medicine designed to restore strength to the patient’s fragile body after illness. Secondly, the book adopts the viewpoint of patients themselves: it investigates how they reacted to the escape from death, the abatement of pain and suffering, and the return to normal life and work. At the heart of getting better was contrast—from ‘paine to ease, sadnesse to mirth, prison to liberty, and death to life’. The third perspective concerns the patient’s loved ones; it shows that family and friends usually shared the feelings of patients, undergoing a dramatic transformation from anguish to elation. This mirroring of experiences, known as ‘fellow-feeling’, reveals the depth of love between many individuals. Through these discussions, the book opens a window onto some of the most profound, as well as the more prosaic, aspects of early modern existence, from attitudes to life and death, to details of what convalescents ate for supper and wore in bed.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::M Medicine
dc.subject.otherrecovery
dc.subject.otherconvalescence
dc.subject.othercure
dc.subject.otherheal
dc.subject.otherpatient
dc.subject.othermedicine
dc.subject.otherdisease
dc.subject.otherdeath
dc.subject.otheremotions
dc.subject.otherjoy
dc.subject.otherEarly modern period
dc.subject.otherGalen
dc.subject.otherGod
dc.subject.otherHumorism
dc.titleMisery to Mirth
dc.title.alternativeRecovery from Illness in Early Modern England
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.1093/oso/9780198779025.001.0001
oapen.relation.isPublishedByb9501915-cdee-4f2a-8030-9c0b187854b2
oapen.relation.isFundedByd859fbd3-d884-4090-a0ec-baf821c9abfd
oapen.relation.isbn9780198779025
oapen.collectionWellcome
oapen.pages288
oapen.place.publicationOxford, UK
oapen.grant.number095760/Z/11/Z
oapen.remark.publicRelevant Wikipedia pages: Early modern period - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_modern_period; Galen - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galen; God - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God; Humorism - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humorism
oapen.identifier.ocn1051781028


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