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dc.contributor.editorStandfield, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-03 11:01:50
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-01T12:36:54Z
dc.date.available2020-04-01T12:36:54Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier1000212
dc.identifierOCN: 1051776515en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/29734
dc.description.abstract"This edited collection focuses on Aboriginal and Māori travel in colonial contexts. Authors in this collection examine the ways that Indigenous people moved and their motivations for doing so. Chapters consider the cultural aspects of travel for Indigenous communities on both sides of the Tasman. Contributors examine Indigenous purposes for mobility, including for community and individual economic wellbeing, to meet other Indigenous or non-Indigenous peoples and experience different cultures, and to gather knowledge or experience, or to escape from colonial intrusion. ‘This volume is the first to take up three challenges in histories of Indigenous mobilities. First, it analyses both mobility and emplacement. Challenging stereotypes of Indigenous people as either fixed or mobile, chapters deconstruct issues with ramifications for contemporary politics and analyses of Indigenous society and of rural and national histories. As such, it is a welcome intervention in a wide range of urgent issues. Second, by examining Indigenous peoples in both Australia and New Zealand, this volume is an innovative step in removing the artificial divisions that have arisen from “national” histories. Third, the collection connects the experiences of colonised Indigenous peoples with those of their colonisers, shifting the long-held stereotypes of Indigenous powerlessness. Chapters then convincingly demonstrate the agency of colonised peoples in shaping the actions and the mobility itself of the colonisers. While the volume overall is aimed at opening up new research questions, and so invites later and even more innovative work, this volume will stand as an important guide to the directions such future work might take.’ — Heather Goodall, Professor Emerita, UTS"
dc.languageEnglish
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HB History::HBJ Regional & national history
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HB History::HBT History: specific events & topics::HBTB Social & cultural history
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JF Society & culture: general::JFS Social groups::JFSL Ethnic studies
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JP Politics & government
dc.subject.otherHistory
dc.subject.otherIndigenous peoples
dc.subject.otherAustralia
dc.subject.otherNew Zealand
dc.subject.otherpolitics
dc.subject.otherAboriginal Australians
dc.subject.otherMaori people
dc.subject.otherNgai Tahu
dc.titleIndigenous Mobilities
dc.title.alternativeAcross and Beyond the Antipodes
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.22459/IM.06.2018
oapen.relation.isPublishedByddc8cc3f-dd57-40ef-b8d5-06f839686b71
oapen.relation.isbn9781760462147
oapen.remark.publicRelevant Wikipedia pages: Aboriginal Australians - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aboriginal_Australians; Indigenous Australians - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_Australians; Maori people - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C4%81ori_people; New Zealand - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand; Ngai Tahu - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ng%C4%81i_Tahu
oapen.identifier.ocn1051776515


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