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dc.contributor.authorThomas, Peter D. G.
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-01 00:00:00
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-01T15:32:12Z
dc.date.available2020-04-01T15:32:12Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier341338
dc.identifierOCN: 59169340en_US
dc.identifier935227818en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/35051
dc.description.abstractThe eighteenth century was for long described as 'the classical age of the constitution' in Britain. The prevailing impression was one of cabinet government based on a two-party system of Whigs and Tories in Parliament, and a monarchy whose powers had been emasculated by the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89. This simple picture was destroyed in 1929 when Sir Lewis Namier published The structure of politics at the accession of George III. In this canonical work, he demonstrated that the monarchy was far more than simply a cipher and that no such party system existed, finding rather that the political divide in Parliament was of an administration comprising a court party and some political factions facing an opposition of other factions, with the votes of independent MPs divided and fluctuating between the two. In this fascinating book Peter D. G. Thomas, Namier's last research student, continues the political story into the first decade of the reign of George III. One of the most controversial figures in modern British history, the King has often been blamed for the loss of Britain's American colonies in an attempt to restore royal power. However, through an analysis of key politicians and ministries of the period, the author here uses Namier's findings to demonstrate that George III was not seeking to advance royal power, and throws light on the extent to which a system of party politics was in operation. In addition, although the structure of British politics revealed by Namier provides the setting for this study, America, India and Ireland are also considered here as important issues of the time. Providing the first chronological survey of power politics and policy-making in the first ten years of George III's reign, this book will be invaluable to all undergraduates studying eighteenth-century British history.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HB History::HBJ Regional & national history::HBJD European history::HBJD1 British & Irish history
dc.subject.otherpolitics
dc.subject.otherbritain
dc.subject.othermonarchy
dc.subject.othergeorgian
dc.subject.otherGeorge III of the United Kingdom
dc.subject.otherJohn Stuart
dc.subject.other3rd Earl of Bute
dc.subject.otherWilliam Pitt the Younger
dc.subject.otherWilliam Pitt
dc.subject.other1st Earl of Chatham
dc.titleGeorge III: King and politicians 1760-1770
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.7228/manchester/9780719064289.001.0001
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy6110b9b4-ba84-42ad-a0d8-f8d877957cdd
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_nameManchester University Press
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_websitehttps://manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/
oapen.remark.publicRelevant Wikipedia pages: George III of the United Kingdom - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_III_of_the_United_Kingdom; John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Stuart,_3rd_Earl_of_Bute; William Pitt the Younger - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Pitt_the_Younger; William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Pitt,_1st_Earl_of_Chatham


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