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dc.contributor.authorBoth, Norbert
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-31 23:55:55
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-10 14:46:32
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-01T15:32:39Z
dc.date.available2020-04-01T15:32:39Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier340272
dc.identifierOCN: 1039278022en_US
dc.identifier54452827en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/35076
dc.description.abstractA detailed analysis of the response to the Yugoslav crisis by one of America's key allies in NATO. The author focuses on the question of how a Western bureaucracy faced up to the most complex foreign policy challenge of the 1990s. The Netherlands, as a 'pocket-sized medium power', is an interesting case study. While the margins for Dutch foreign policy are limited, fate had it that the Netherlands occupied the European presidency during the second half of 1991, when the recognition issue divided the West and the parameters for the subsequent international intervention in the Balkans were set. By July 1995, the involvement of the Netherlands had deepened to the extent that Dutch troops who found themselves trapped in the UN safe area of Srebrenica together with the local Muslim population were unable to prevent the worst massacre in Europe since the Second World War. This study is based on interviews with all the major players, including two former Defence Ministers and two former Ministers of Foreign Affairs, and on documents from the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, made available under the country's own 'freedom of information act'.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HB History
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JP Politics & government
dc.subject.otherpublic administration
dc.subject.othergeschiedenis
dc.subject.otherbestuurskunde
dc.subject.otherpolitical science
dc.subject.otherpoliticologie
dc.subject.otherhistory, geography, and auxiliary disciplines
dc.titleFrom Indifference to Entrapment
dc.title.alternativeThe Netherlands and the Yugoslav Crisis, 1990-1995
dc.typebook
oapen.abstract.otherlanguageA detailed analysis of the response to the Yugoslav crisis by one of America's key allies in NATO. The author focuses on the question of how a Western bureaucracy faced up to the most complex foreign policy challenge of the 1990s. The Netherlands, as a 'pocket-sized medium power', is an interesting case study. While the margins for Dutch foreign policy are limited, fate had it that the Netherlands occupied the European presidency during the second half of 1991, when the recognition issue divided the West and the parameters for the subsequent international intervention in the Balkans were set. By July 1995, the involvement of the Netherlands had deepened to the extent that Dutch troops who found themselves trapped in the UN safe area of Srebrenica together with the local Muslim population were unable to prevent the worst massacre in Europe since the Second World War. This study is based on interviews with all the major players, including two former Defence Ministers and two former Ministers of Foreign Affairs, and on documents from the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, made available under the country's own 'freedom of information act'.
oapen.identifier.doi10.5117/9789053564530
oapen.relation.isPublishedBydd3d1a33-0ac2-4cfe-a101-355ae1bd857a
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_nameAmsterdam University Press
virtual.oapen_relation_isPublishedBy.publisher_websitehttps://www.aup.nl/
oapen.pages266


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