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dc.contributor.authorBirkinbine, Benjamin
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-15T14:08:59Z
dc.date.available2020-04-15T14:08:59Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.isbn9781912656424en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781912656448en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781912656455en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/37226
dc.description.abstractThe concept of ‘the commons’ has been used as a framework to understand resources shared by a community rather than a private entity, and it has also inspired social movements working against the enclosure of public goods and resources. One such resource is free (libre) and open source software (FLOSS). FLOSS emerged as an alternative to proprietary software in the 1980s. However, both the products and production processes of FLOSS have become incorporated into capitalist production. For example, Red Hat, Inc. is a large publicly traded company whose business model relies entirely on free software, and IBM, Intel, Cisco, Samsung, Google are some of the largest contributors to Linux, the open-source operating system. This book explores the ways in which FLOSS has been incorporated into digital capitalism. Just as the commons have been used as a motivational frame for radical social movements, it has also served the interests of free-marketeers, corporate libertarians, and states to expand their reach by dragging the shared resources of social life onto digital platforms so they can be integrated into the global capitalist system. The book concludes by asserting the need for a critical political economic understanding of the commons that foregrounds (digital) labour, class struggle, and uneven power distribution within the digital commons as well as between FLOSS communities and their corporate sponsors.en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCritical, Digital and Social Media Studiesen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::G Reference, information & interdisciplinary subjects::GT Interdisciplinary studies::GTC Communication studiesen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::K Economics, finance, business & management::KC Economics::KCP Political economyen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JF Society & culture: general::JFD Media studiesen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::K Economics, finance, business & management::KN Industry & industrial studies::KNT Media, information & communication industriesen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::K Economics, finance, business & management::KJ Business & management::KJZ History of specific companies / corporate historyen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JH Sociology & anthropology::JHB Sociology::JHBL Sociology: work & labouren_US
dc.subject.otherCommonsen_US
dc.subject.otherpolitical economyen_US
dc.subject.otherfree softwareen_US
dc.subject.otheropen sourceen_US
dc.subject.otherdigital capitalismen_US
dc.subject.othersoftware studiesen_US
dc.titleIncorporating the Digital Commonsen_US
dc.title.alternativeCorporate Involvement in Free and Open Source Softwareen_US
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.16997/book39en_US
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy2725c638-53f3-4872-9824-99c3555366f3en_US
oapen.series.number14
oapen.pages158en_US
oapen.place.publicationLondonen_US
oapen.remark.publicFunder: University of Westminster


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