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dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-28T10:00:31Z
dc.date.available2020-10-28T10:00:31Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.isbn978180064290en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781800640306en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781800641044en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781800641051en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781800641068en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/42726
dc.description.abstract"The idea that the digital age has revolutionized our day-to-day experience of the world is nothing new, and has been amply recognized by cultural historians. In contrast, Stephen Robertson’s BC: Before Computers is a work which questions the idea that the mid-twentieth century saw a single moment of rupture. It is about all the things that we had to learn, invent, and understand – all the ways we had to evolve our thinking – before we could enter the information technology revolution of the second half of the twentieth century. Its focus ranges from the beginnings of data processing, right back to such originary forms of human technology as the development of writing systems, gathering a whole history of revolutionary moments in the development of information technologies into a single, although not linear narrative. Treading the line between philosophy and technical history, Robertson draws on his extensive technical knowledge to produce a text which is both thought-provoking and accessible to a wide range of readers. The book is wide in scope, exploring the development of technologies in such diverse areas as cryptography, visual art and music, and the postal system. Through all this, it does not simply aim to tell the story of computer developments but to show that those developments rely on a long history of humans creating technologies for increasingly sophisticated methods of manipulating information. Through a clear structure and engaging style, it brings together a wealth of informative and conceptual explorations into the history of human technologies, and avoids assumptions about any prior knowledge on the part of the reader. As such, it has the potential to be of interest to the expert and the general reader alike."en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::U Computing & information technologyen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::G Reference, information & interdisciplinary subjects::GP Research & information: general::GPF Information theoryen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JN Education::JNV Educational equipment & technology, computer-aided learning (CAL)en_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::B Biography & True Storiesen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::U Computing & information technology::UB Information technology: general issuesen_US
dc.subject.otherhistory of computer developmentsen_US
dc.subject.otherdigital ageen_US
dc.subject.othercomputeren_US
dc.subject.otherinformation technology revolutionen_US
dc.subject.otherdata processingen_US
dc.subject.othercryptographyen_US
dc.subject.othervisual arten_US
dc.subject.othermusicen_US
dc.subject.otherpostal systemen_US
dc.titleB C, Before Computersen_US
dc.title.alternativeOn Information Technology from Writing to the Age of Digital Dataen_US
dc.typebook
oapen.identifier.doi10.11647/OBP.0225en_US
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy23117811-c361-47b4-8b76-2c9b160c9a8ben_US
oapen.collectionScholarLeden_US
oapen.pages170en_US


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