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dc.contributor.authorBivins, Roberta
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-18T13:55:04Z
dc.date.available2021-06-18T13:55:04Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/49621
dc.description.abstractLike their peers across western Europe, Australia and the Americas, large segments of the British public and a significant proportion of Britain’s medical establishment have enthusiastically promoted medical screening (and de facto medical selection) of would-be migrants since World War II. Moreover, from 1962, British law explicitly empowered medical inspection and the exclusion of migrants on health grounds at all three of Britain’s idiosyncratic ‘medical borders’: during entry clearance procedures in their countries of origin; at Britain’s ports and airports; and via public health surveillance in the British towns and cities that were the migrants’ destinations. However, Britain’s geographical and internal borders were largely unmedicalised in the twentieth century and remain comparatively free from specifically medical controls even today. I explore the role of the National Health Service – both as a national symbol and as a physical institution – in shaping and responding to this paradox. Given the intensity of popular suspicions of migrants’ bodies and their hygienic and reproductive practices, and the frequency with which medical claims mediated and bolstered anti-migrant rhetoric, why has medical ‘control’ itself proven politically elusive and persistently suspect?en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRethinking bordersen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::P Mathematics & science::PS Biology, life sciences::PSX Human biology::PSXM Medical anthropologyen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::M Medicine::MB Medicine: general issues::MBX History of medicineen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JH Sociology & anthropology::JHM Anthropology::JHMC Social & cultural anthropology, ethnographyen_US
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JF Society & culture: general::JFF Social issues & processes::JFFN Migration, immigration & emigrationen_US
dc.subject.othermedical borders; racialised migrants; health controls; medical inspection; United Kingdom; Commonwealth; migration; National Health Service; medical surveillanceen_US
dc.titleChapter 9 ‘Suspect’ screeningen_US
dc.title.alternativethe limits of Britain’s medicalised borders, 1962–1981en_US
dc.typechapter
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy6110b9b4-ba84-42ad-a0d8-f8d877957cdden_US
oapen.relation.isPartOfBook7dee4ac4-417a-4be6-8abf-3788ba3074f0en_US
oapen.relation.isFundedByd859fbd3-d884-4090-a0ec-baf821c9abfden_US
oapen.collectionWellcomeen_US
oapen.pages29en_US
oapen.place.publicationManchesteren_US
oapen.grant.number104837/Z/14/Z


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