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dc.contributor.editorAnnola, Johanna
dc.contributor.editorDrakman, Annelie
dc.contributor.editorUlväng, Marie
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-16T10:19:41Z
dc.date.available2021-12-16T10:19:41Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifierONIX_20211216_9789188661975_12
dc.identifier.urihttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/52056
dc.languageSwedish
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences::JF Society & culture: general::JFC Cultural studies::JFCX History of ideas
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::J Society & social sciences
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::H Humanities::HB History
dc.subject.otherLabour
dc.subject.otherGender
dc.subject.otherNordic countries
dc.subject.otherLate 19th century
dc.subject.otherHealth
dc.subject.otherCleanliness
dc.titleMed tvål, vatten och flit
dc.title.alternativeHälsofrämjande renlighet som ideal och praktik, ca 1870–1930
dc.typebook
oapen.abstract.otherlanguageWith soap, water, and diligence discusses attitudes and practices around cleanliness and health at the turn of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. At this time, scientific findings on how diseases spread had rendered both the body and the home as particularly risky in terms of the health of an individual. However, the zeal for cleaning was more than just a health issue – it also contributed to societal change at large. This book aims at deepening our understanding of cleanliness in relation to social class, gender, work, consumption, and space, viewed from a Nordic perspective. The battle against dirt was fought on a broad front, and on different levels of society. The book at hands offers glimpses of the long and complex societal process which was required for the Nordic societies to grow cleaner over time. Behind the gradually increasing interest in soap and lather lay challenges, negotiations, and disagreements about the ways in which cleanliness should be advanced, and who would be the ones advancing it. To establish the supremacy of soap required a lot of hard work. The ten chapters shed light on the interaction between debaters, voluntary associations, institutions, and individuals. How was cleanliness promoted and what was the reception like? Who and what was to be cleaned, and on which terms? What did cleanliness mean in different contexts and for different individuals? The book makes both ideals and practices visible by exploring the ways in which the gospel of cleanliness was presented, propagated, understood, questioned and renewed, and also by showing that in some cases people’s quest for cleanliness had motivations other than those intended by the promoters. The chapters have been written by economic historians, ethnologists, social historians, and historians of ideas from Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. The book is intended for students, scholars and the general reading audience interested in a social historical perspective on cleanliness.
oapen.identifier.doi10.21525/kriterium.33
oapen.relation.isPublishedBy7b034f4a-b816-4718-88ac-63b24c8e4b24
oapen.relation.isbn9789188661975
oapen.relation.isbn9789188909961
oapen.imprintKriterium
oapen.pages285
oapen.place.publicationGothenburg


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