Show simple item record

dc.contributor.editorReagle, Joseph
dc.contributor.editorKoerner, Jackie
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-15T13:31:29Z
dc.date.available2020-12-15T13:31:29Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/43467
dc.description.abstractWikipedia’s first twenty years: how what began as an experiment in collaboration became the world’s most popular reference work. We have been looking things up in Wikipedia for twenty years. What began almost by accident—a wiki attached to a nascent online encyclopedia—has become the world’s most popular reference work. Regarded at first as the scholarly equivalent of a Big Mac, Wikipedia is now known for its reliable sourcing and as a bastion of (mostly) reasoned interaction. How has Wikipedia, built on a model of radical collaboration, remained true to its original mission of “free access to the sum of all human knowledge” when other tech phenomena have devolved into advertising platforms? In this book, scholars, activists, and volunteers reflect on Wikipedia’s first twenty years, revealing connections across disciplines and borders, languages and data, the professional and personal. The contributors consider Wikipedia’s history, the richness of the connections that underpin it, and its founding vision. Their essays look at, among other things, the shift from bewilderment to respect in press coverage of Wikipedia; Wikipedia as “the most important laboratory for social scientific and computing research in history”; and the acknowledgment that “free access” includes not just access to the material but freedom to contribute—that the summation of all human knowledge is biased by who documents it. Contributors Phoebe Ayers, Omer Benjakob, Yochai Benkler, William Beutler, Siko Bouterse, Rebecca Thorndike-Breeze, Amy Carleton, Robert Cummings, LiAnna L. Davis, Siân Evans, Heather Ford, Stephen Harrison, Heather Hart, Benjamin Mako Hill, Dariusz Jemielniak, Brian Keegan, Jackie Koerner, Alexandria Lockett, Jacqueline Mabey, Katherine Maher, Michael Mandiberg, Stephane Coillet-Matillon, Cecelia A. Musselman, Eliza Myrie, Jake Orlowitz, Ian A. Ramjohn, Joseph Reagle, Anasuya Sengupta, Aaron Shaw, Melissa Tamani, Jina Valentine, Matthew Vetter, Adele Vrana, Denny Vrandečić
dc.languageEnglish
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::U Computing & information technology::UD Digital lifestyle
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::G Reference, information & interdisciplinary subjects::GL Library & information sciences::GLF IT, Internet & electronic resources in libraries
dc.subject.classificationbic Book Industry Communication::U Computing & information technology::UB Information technology: general issues::UBW Internet: general works
dc.subject.otherComputers
dc.subject.otherInternet
dc.subject.otherUser-generated Content
dc.subject.otherLanguage Arts & Disciplines
dc.subject.otherLibrary & Information Science
dc.subject.otherDigital & Online Resources
dc.subject.otherComputers
dc.subject.otherInternet
dc.subject.otherGeneral
dc.titleWikipedia @ 20
dc.title.alternativeStories of an Incomplete Revolution
dc.typebook
oapen.relation.isPublishedByf49dea23-efb1-407d-8ac0-6ed2b5cb4b74
oapen.relation.isFundedByb818ba9d-2dd9-4fd7-a364-7f305aef7ee9
oapen.relation.isbn9780262538176
oapen.collectionKnowledge Unlatched (KU)
oapen.imprintThe MIT Press
oapen.identifierhttps://openresearchlibrary.org/viewer/4c24aae9-0c4f-4b3f-8d78-b15e2d743630
oapen.identifier.isbn9780262538176
grantor.number104350


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record